Ferriby 1 (ca. 1300 BCE)

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(Created page with 'category: Ships Two additional, similar sets of hull remains were not as well preserved but are believed to be of similar size and construction. Conservation was attempted o…')
 
 
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[[category: Ships]]
 
[[category: Ships]]
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== Background ==
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Two additional, similar sets of hull remains were not as well preserved but are believed to be of similar size and construction.  Conservation was attempted on all remains but was largely unsuccessful.  The timbers are now stored in the Hull and East Riding Museum.
 
Two additional, similar sets of hull remains were not as well preserved but are believed to be of similar size and construction.  Conservation was attempted on all remains but was largely unsuccessful.  The timbers are now stored in the Hull and East Riding Museum.
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== Hull Construction ==
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The seams were caulked with an elaborate system of moss held in place by battens located inside the seams. Bottom seams were stabilized by means of rods held in place by cleats.  
 
The seams were caulked with an elaborate system of moss held in place by battens located inside the seams. Bottom seams were stabilized by means of rods held in place by cleats.  
 
<sup>1</sup>
 
<sup>1</sup>
  
 
== References ==
 
== References ==
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1. Richard Steffy, INA Shipdata Project, Texas A&M University.
 
1. Richard Steffy, INA Shipdata Project, Texas A&M University.

Latest revision as of 19:40, 6 December 2010


Background

Two additional, similar sets of hull remains were not as well preserved but are believed to be of similar size and construction. Conservation was attempted on all remains but was largely unsuccessful. The timbers are now stored in the Hull and East Riding Museum.

Hull Construction

The seams were caulked with an elaborate system of moss held in place by battens located inside the seams. Bottom seams were stabilized by means of rods held in place by cleats. 1

References

1. Richard Steffy, INA Shipdata Project, Texas A&M University.

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