EVOLUTION OF ENGLISH HOUSEHOLD TABLEWARE

PERIOD I

PERIOD II

PERIOD II

PERIOD III

PERIOD IV

PERIOD V

PERIOD VI

(pre 1600)

(1600-1740)

Tradewares

(1740-1765)

(1765-1770)

(1770-1820)

(1820s-1900s)



PERIOD II (continued):
TRADE WARES

SPANISH OLIVE JAR

  • throughout 16th - 19th centuries

  • soft, buff body; early styles are usually lead glazed on interior (olive green to brown in color); later types can be glazed on both the interior and exterior; thin white, exterior slip also common on earlier styles

  • body and neck shape changed through time; example shown opposite is a later style (ring neck, no handles; see below for range of styles)

  • generally used for transporting and storing foodstuffs

OLIVE JAR STYLE CHANGES THROUGH TIME:


EARLY STYLE: ca. 1500-1580






MIDDLE STYLE: ca. 1580-1780







LATE STYLE: ca. 1780-1850

CHINESE EXPORT PORCELAIN

  • ca. 1574-1830

  • high-fired, vitrified (non-porous), white ceramic composed of kaolin and petuntse clays; shiny, transparent glaze with a slight blue tint; undecorated or hand painted in monochrome (cobalt blue) under the glaze; polychrome palette and gilding over the glaze

  • fine table/tea wares, toiletry wares
   

TIN-ENAMELED WARE (MAJOLICA)

  • 1400s - present (Italy); in Spain and Mexico, from 1600

  • soft, buff/pale yellow to pinkish cream/red body covered with an opaque enamel on which hand-painted floral or geometric designs are painted in monochrome (cobalt blue) or polychrome

  • table/tea wares, ornamental pieces


GERMAN STONEWARE

(a) RHENISH (RAEREN, FRECHEN)

  • ca. 1550-1700

  • hard, non-porous, brown or grayish brown body fired at high temperatures and usually salt glazed (a high-temperature glaze formed by the addition of common salt into the kiln at its highest temperature)

  • kitchen/utility ware, particularly the storage of liquids

  • Bellarmine jugs common 1550-1625

    - see example of Bellarmine jugs opposite; fragments of face masks and molded medallions from these jugs are often found in archaeological sites (see above left)

(b) WESTERWALD

  • ca. 1650-1775

  • fine, blue-gray body decorated in cobalt blue and (later) manganese purple

    -sprig-molded decoration, 1650-1725
    -stamped blue floral and geometric designs,
    1700-1775

  • usually tableware (mugs, jugs), chamber pots

NORTH ITALIAN MARBLED SLIPWARE

  • ca. 1610-1660

  • white/cream marbled design slipped over a soft light red body; lead glazed on exterior

  • the costrel (drinking flask) form is common in this ware type; in the example shown opposite, the remains of two small loop handles molded in the shape of an animal/human mask are evident; a cord or leather thong, passed through each of these handles, allowed the vessel to be carried

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