BY MADELEINE J. DONACHIE 

 
In 1692, Port Royal, an English settlement on the island of Jamaica, was hit by a devastating earthquake at the peak of its commercial prosperity.   The tremors from the earthquake and the ensuing tidal wave submerged over half of the city beneath the waters of Kingston Bay.   The buildings sank into the bay in an almost vertical fashion, and the walls of the structures fell inwards, on to the rooms and floors.  The disaster that hit Port Royal created a sealed time capsule of life in the 17th century.  The city lay undisturbed in its watery grave for nearly 300 years.

 

In 1981, Texas A&M University, in conjunction with the Jamaica National Heritage Trust and the Institute of Nautical Archaeology, began underwater excavations at the city of Port Royal.   The investigations continued for 10 years, focusing on the remains of Lime Street, in the commercial center of town.

Thousands of artifacts have been recovered from Port Royal, with imported and local pottery forming a significant part of the assemblage.  The following pages focus on the English slipware recovered from the site. 
 

 

HISTORY OF SLIP-DECORATED POTTERY

ENGLISH POTTERS &  POTTERIES

THE PORT ROYAL SLIPWARE ASSEMBLAGE

OTHER ARTIFACTS FROM PORT ROYAL

Citation Information:
2000, Donachie, Madeleine, Slipware at Port Royal, Jamaica, World Wide Web URL,  http://nautarch.tamu.edu/PROJECTS/PR-project/slipware/slip-home.html
Port Royal Project, Nautical ArchaeologyProgram, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas. March 14, 2001.

This site was written and is maintained by Madeleine J. Donachie, a graduate student in anthropology at Texas A&M University.  The contents of this site are for personal information only.  Any questions or comments should be directed to mdonachie@yahoo.com